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HomeWhen a day beginsMore on Philo's SabbatMore on 15th SabbathAudio MessagesPentecost CalendarNature Proves PentecosThings We Need to KnowPaul's PentecostCelts PentecostBOTH God and man

A good question to ask is, if the truth Pentecost is in the fourth month, around the last of July or the first of August, then why are they not a festival, pagan or otherwise, around this time like is the case with the other true feasts/Chags of the Almighty?  And what is the counterfeit feast in the third month for the traditional third month Pentecost?  I know they celebrate Easter around Passover and Halloween around Tabernacles but what about Pentecost?


 I can show where the  "ancient Celtic" people observed the "firstfruits" of the  "wheat harvest" in the  "summertime" around the last day of  "July" or the first day of August which is in harmony with counting the 50 days "after" the seventh Sabbath complete instead of 50 days from the wave sheaf or after the first Sabbath.  Can anyone show a counterfeit feast in the third month for the traditional third month Pentecost?  Remember the adversary has a counterfeit for all the true feasts/Chags but I can not think of one in the third month.


The main thing I would like to point out in the following articles on the Ancient Celtic people, who understood that the WHEAT HARVEST was not celebrated in the THIRD MONTH but in the FOURTH MONTH or beginning of the 5th. These Celts obviously knew something about farming and what crops were grown when. All the Paganism associated with these festivals does not change the facts of nature and that WHEAT HARVEST was not in the THIRD MONTH, but the FIFTH MONTH. It would be like someone saying that we are having the first fruits of watermelon harvest in the springtime/THIRD MONTH and everyone knows or should know that watermelons are not harvested in the springtime but are harvested in the summertime. The Same is true with grapes, the harvest of grapes is not in the springtime, but in the summertime, same as the original wheat harvest that is found in Scripture and this is why they were being accused of drinking new wine on the day of Pentecost in the book Acts of the Apostles.

I think it is time for someone to explain why the Ancient Israelite people thought that the FIRST FRUITS of the WHEAT harvest was on April 1st, which would be 50 days AFTER the seventh Sabbath complete as Leviticus 23:16 teaches.

The Historical facts shows that the Ancient Celtic People (whom we know to be Ancient Israelites) observed 4 MAJOR festivals each year and one of them was the “FIRST FRUITS” of the “WHEAT HARVEST” which they observed on July 31st or the first day of August which is in harmony with numbering 50 days AFTER the seventh Sabbath complete, as Leviticus 23:16 teaches, instead of 50 days after the wave sheaf.

Why didn’t someone tell these Israelite people, who were farmers, that the FIRST FRUITS of the WHEAT HARVEST was in the THIRD month instead of the FIFTH month?

Didn’t they know that everyone knew, especially the farmers, that there was no wheat harvest in the FIFTH MONTH? Or were they?

YES there was a wheat harvest in the FIFTH MONTH and it is the scriptural wheat harvest that is planted in the first month and harvested in the fourth month like our Saviour said, “say not ye they are yet FOUR months then the harvest”. The winter wheat that is planted today, around September or October, takes SEVEN MONTHS to harvest and cannot be found in Scripture. Yes The Ancient Celtic People knew what they were talking about and that is why they observed Pentecost 50 days AFTER the seventh Sabbath complete as Leviticus 23:16 teaches.

The problem comes in when people do not understand that there is no record of a wheat harvest in the THIRD MONTH, found in Scripture. Not only is there ABSOLUTELY NO conclusive wheat harvest in the THIRD MONTH but it is an “ABSOLUTE FACT” that there is “NO” THIRD MONTH “FEAST” of “ANY KIND” found in Scripture.

Realizing that there are TWO types of wheat that is planted today, WINTER WHEAT, which is planted around September or October and harvested SEVEN MONTHS later, in the springtime about two weeks after the barley harvest, and SUMMER WHEAT which is planted in the first month/springtime, and harvested AFTER FOUR MONTHS, the question arises WHICH wheat harvest was the scriptural Pentecost we harvest???

It is obvious, from the Historical facts, that the Ancient Celtic People observed only one MAJOR FEAST for Pentecost wheat harvest and that was on the first day of August, which would correspond with counting 50 days AFTER the seventh Sabbath complete as prescribed in Leviticus 23:16.

When I say there is NOT even a THIRD MONTH FEAST mentioned in Scripture, all someone has to do to prove me wrong is give me chapter and verse to the contrary. I can give chapter and verse of a FEAST/Chag recorded at the END of the FOURTH MONTH or the beginning of the FIFTH MONTH, and can also prove from Scripture and Nature itself that the WHEAT HARVEST found in Scripture, was in the summertime, when the grapes were ripe, instead of the springtime.

As the Holy Prophet Joel prophesied in the second chapter of Joel, that the Holy Spirit would be poured out in the last days and “the floors would be full of WHEAT and the WINE PRESSES would be FULL OF WINE”. This happened on the day of Pentecost but there’s one thing wrong with this being in the THIRD MONTH because it is agriculturally “IMPOSSIBLE” to have any grapes or wine in the wine presses in the THIRD MONTH.

Although It is absolutely IMPOSSIBLE for this prophecy to be full filed in the THIRD MONTH, it is possible to have the NEW WINE in the presses at the END of the FOURTH MONTH or the beginning of the FIFTH MONTH as we see the Ancient Celtic People celebrating the FIRST FRUITS of the WHEAT HARVEST on the FIRST DAY OF AUGUST but you MUST count 50 days AFTER the seventh Sabbath complete as Leviticus 23:16 teaches, instead of 50 days after the wave sheaf, as tradition teaches. see my article on PENTECOST at www.lunarsabbath.info for more details.

I have demonstrated how the Historical facts show that Philo, who live at the time our Saviour and the Apostles, observed Pentecost 50 days AFTER the seventh seven complete instead of 50 days after the wave sheaf. Leviticus 23:16.

As I have said, someone should explain why The Ancient Celtic People celebrated Pentecost on August first?

I have much I could say on this subject but will finish later, I just wanted to run what I written so far by the gain Sayers and see their response.

A man named Ted Walters brought to my attention, the word Lammas, a word I had never heard of, and how it refers to the new growth that appears on oak trees and other trees during the summertime, around the last of July or first of August and the word means “FIRST FRUITS” or “LOAF MASS” and after searching a number of web sites I found that the Ancient Celtic people held a feast on this same day and a lot of people know that the Celtic people are descendents from ancient Israelites.

I found that During this feast they would make LOAVES OF BREAD from the FIRST FRUITS of the WHEAT HARVEST and place them on the altar and this was done at the end of the fourth month of July, on the 31st, or the first day of August which corresponds to numbering 50 days AFTER the seventh Sabbath complete, as Leviticus 23:16 teaches.

If the "ancient Celtic" people observed the "firstfruits" of the "wheat harvest" in the "summertime" around the last day of "July" or the first day of August which is in harmony with counting the 50 days "AFTER" the seventh Sabbath complete instead of 50 days from the wave sheaf or after the FIRST Sabbath, which would be in the springtime of the third month and I have shown there is no feast mentioned in scripture in the third month. This is an Absolute and there is no conclusive wheat harvest in the third month found in Scripture. As a matter of fact there is no third month harvest found any where in Scripture and I challenge anyone to find one and if you cannot find a feast or harvest in the third month, then why try to get someone to keep a third month feast unless it is strictly a tradition of man?

The following was gleaned from web sites under "Lammus" or “LUGHNASADH” which means "loaf mass" please try to remember that the people who are writing these articles are not trying to prove or disprove anything, they are simply showing what the ancient Celtic people done around the last of July and the first of August. As a matter of fact, I think it would be safe to say that these people never realized that this ancient Celtic festival could have been Pentecost because in their minds the Pentecost feast occurs in the third month during the springtime instead of the fourth month during the summer. But we will soon see that these ancient Celtic people were keeping an ancient custom or tradition of the first fruits of wheat harvest, better known as Pentecost or first fruits or Feast of Weeks, in the end of the 4th month or biginning of the 5th. You can bet your bottom dollar that if this same Celtic ritual occurred near the beginning of the third month, which most everyone believes is Pentecost, instead of the end of the fourth month, they would have sworn it was Pentecost.

LUGHNASADH

Kathleen Dupree

“The grain is ripe for harvest. Apple trees and gardens bear forth the fruits of summer. This is the time of Lughnasadh, the ancient Celtic festival held in celebration of the first fruits of the harvest.

The modern Irish spelling, Lúnasa, is the name of the month of August in Irish Gaelic. Lughnasadh, an older spelling, is often used to designate the name of the seasonal festival that surrounds the first day of the month of August. In Scots Gaelic the day is known as Lunasda or Lunasdal. This is the time that marks a REST FROM LABOR, a time to take stock of what the SUMMER sun has yielded. It is a time to CELEBRATE and enjoy the outcome of our daily toil.

At this GATHERING were held games and contests of skill as well as a GREAT FEAST made up of the FIRST FRUITS of the SUMMER HARVEST.”http://www.leyline.org/cra/articles/lughnasadh.html

Ancient celebration"

Lughnasadh was one of the FOUR MAIN  medieval Irish customs: Imbolc at the beginning of February, Beltane on the first of May, “Lughnasadh” in August and Samhain in October. The early Celtic calendar was based on the lunar, solar and vegetative cycles, so the actual calendar date was variable. Lughnasadh marked the beginning of the harvest season, the ripening of first fruits, and was traditionally a time of community gatherings, market festivals, horse races and reunions with distant family and friends.”,festivals

NOTICE that the first Festival mentioned here is in February which corresponds, according to my Smith’s Bible dictionary, with the 12th Jewish month, February and March, and the only festival he lists in the 12th month is the feast of Esther on the 13th and Purim on the 14th and 15th of the 12th month but at any rate, this cannot be Pentecost that they were celebrating.

NOTICE that the next MAJOR FEAST that was mentioned, was celebrated on the first of May which corresponds with “PASSOVER” which can fall on the first of May. The next major feast mentioned is “Lughnasadh” in August which corresponds with PENTECOST if you number 50 DAYS AFTER the seventh Sabbath complete according to Leviticus 23:16. At any rate there is no way possible that this feast of the first fruit of wheat harvest can correspond with 50 days after the wave sheath.

NOTICE that the next MAJOR FEAST is in OCTOBER which corresponds with TABERNACLES . The point I would like to make here is that PENTECOST is a major feast same as Tabernacles, Passover, and Purim, and we know that the ancient Israelites celebrated Pentecost. One key thing to remember is that there are two types of wheat grown today but the scripture only mentions one which was the Pentecost wheat that is planted in the spring/first month and harvested in the summertime/the end of the fourth month and beginning of the fifth, not harvested in the springtime.

These ancient Israelite people were keeping the festivals of Yahweh according to the great lights of Genesis 1:14 and according to the harvest seasons, spring harvest, summer harvest, and fall harvest, and the scripture and Historical facts show that there was never a celebration in the third month nor was they a harvest in the third month.

When I make statements like “there is NOT even a third month harvest of any kind, mentioned in Scripture”, “there is NOT a third month feast of any kind mentioned in Scripture for a third month Pentecost”, “there is NO conclusive winter wheat, which is harvested in the springtime, mentioned in Scripture”, “the only provable springtime harvest mentioned in Scripture is the barley harvest. The summer harvest is the wheat harvest and the fall harvest is from the trees etc.”, SOMEONE should be able to go to a scripture and prove me wrong. Is that asking too much?

Remember I just said that there is NO NO NO “third month” harvest OR feast mentioned in Scripture and tradition of men would have me keep a feast in the third month anyhow but why should I??? I don’t want any vain worship in my life and that is what we have if we follow the traditions of men, that is not scriptural. Let me say it one more time, there is “NO” feast in the third month found in Scripture.

The scriptural Tabernacle can fall in October and the scriptural Passover can fall in May and the scriptural Pentecost can fall in August but the traditional Pentecost can never ever fall in August and it is very embarrassing to the traditional third month Pentecost, not to be able to find any place in Scripture or conclusive Historical evidence of ancient Israel keeping a third month Pentecost and I have shown else where concerning the historians Josephus and Philo did not promote a 50 days after way sheaf Pentecost as some suggest.

ancient Israel’s calendar was lunar solar unlike the solar only Roman calendar which is used today. Continuing on,Lughnasadh (pronounced lune-ah-sah) was a summer festival of the ancient Celts, celebrated around August 1 My understanding is that it is known that it was celebrated at either the full moon or the new moon closest to the midpoint between the summer solstice and the autumnal equinox. Since the midpoint is on August 6th, that means that this year, Lughnasadh falls on either July 25 (the new moon). the Gray, green, gold, yellow
Symbols: All grains, breads, threshing tools, athame
Date: Occurs 1/4 of a year after Beltaine. True astrological point is 15 degrees Leo, but tradition has set August 1st as the day it is typically celebrated. Since the Ancients Celts passed their days from sundown to sundown, the celebration would usually begin the night before on July 31st. LET ME STOP HERE A MINUTE AND SAY I AM NOT MAKING THIS UP AND I DID NIT EVEN WRITE THIS, AND I WILL GIVE THE WEB SITES SHORTLY.

“This sabbat is also known as the celebration of bread As bread was one of the main staples of our ancestors, the ripening of the grain was the cause for GREAT CELEBRATION. The reaping, threshing and preparation of these breads spawned great ritual and ceremony to ensure bounty for the following year. .

This time of the year finds us with fields to harvest, the first of a bountiful crop that will hold us through the winter months. Even though the hottest days of summer are upon us, we have but to observe to see that fall is just around the corner. Shadows are growing longer as the days slowly become shorter. Squirrels are busily gathering food for the coming winter. It is a time to begin canning produce from the garden, a time to save and preserve.”  

NOTICE this has to be referring to spring wheat harvest instead of winter wheat harvest. Winter wheat is planted in September or October and harvested in the spring time about two weeks after barley harvest but the summer or spring wheat is planted in the springtime and is harvested in the summer time around the end of July and first of August and this is the only conclusive wheat harvest mentioned in Scripture. More reading from the Internet,my

“In English-speaking countries, August 1 is Lammas Day or loaf-mass day, the festival of the first “wheatharvest of the year. On this day it was customary to bring to church a loaf made from the new crop. In many parts of England, tenants were bound to present freshly harvested “wheat to their landlords on or before the first day of August. In the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, where it is referred to regularly, it is called "the feast of first fruits".The blessing of new fruits was performed annually in both the Eastern and Western Churches on the first, or the sixth, of August. The Sacramentary of Pope Gregory I (d. 604) specifies the sixth. ”

In mediæval times the feast was known as the "Gule of August", but the meaning of "gule" is unknown. Ronald Hutton suggests that it may be an Anglicisation of gwyl aust, the Welsh name for August 1 meaning "feast of August", but this is not certain. If so, this points to a pre-Christian origin for Lammas among the Anglo-Saxons and a link to the Gaelic festival of Lughnasadh

NOTICE none of these people are connecting any of this with the feast of Pentecost, and that because of tradition, thinking that Pentecost is in the third month contrary to Leviticus 23:16 and other scriptures. They should have asked themselves, why wasn’t these ancient Israelite people doing all this in the third month? Can any of you who are reading this, show any conclusive Historical evidence where ancient Israel kept a feast In the third month? I have already proven that a third month feast cannot be found in Scripture, the third month Pentecost is solely based on the traditions of man and not scripture. I challenge anyone to find a third month feast in Scripture. Reading on,

“The Old Ways: Lammas
by Doug and Sandy Kopf

Lammas, the festival of the First Fruits of the Harvest, is the first festival of the Waning Year. It is celebrated on July 31 while the climate (in the United States) is essentially still Summer. ,

Lammas takes its name from the Old English "hlaf," meaning "loaf" and "maesse," meaning “feast. Lammas has often been taken to mean Lamb-mass, because on August 1, the next day, is the Feast of St. Peter's Chains, at which lambs are taken to church for blessing. (Can't you just picture a priest of the early Church saying, "Lammas? We can do that HERE! Just tell them to bring their lambs to Church!) ”

This festival is also called "Lugnasadh" (Loo-nah-sah), which has an entirely different meaning. The element "nasadh" relates to the Gaelic, "to give in marriage," and so would mean the "Marriage of Lug," rather than Lugh's Mass, which is a common interpretation. There is also some debate as to who the bride is, if there is one. Some authorities favor Tailltiu (Lugh's foster mother) and others favor Eriu, i.e., Ireland, herself.

Although we do not celebrate a marriage at this time, preferring the loaf-feast concept, it is interesting to note that July 31 is exactly nine months prior to Beltane, which was once celebrated as the beginning of the New Year.

Until recent years, in Scotland, the first cut of the Harvest was made on Lammas Day, and was a RITUAL IN ITSELF. The entire family must dress in their finest clothing and go into the fields. The head of the family would lay his bonnet (hat) on the ground and, facing the Sun, cut the first handful of corn with a sickle. He would then put the corn Sun-wise around his head three times while thanking the God of the Harvest for "corn and bread, food and flocks, wool and clothing, health and strength, and peace and plenty." This custom was called the "Iolach Buana."

In the British Isles, the custom of giving the First Fruits to the Gods evolved into giving them to the landlord. Lammas is now the traditional time for tenant farmers to pay their rent. Thus, Lammas is seen as a day of judgment or reckoning. From this practice comes the phrase "--at latter Lammas", meaning "never", or "not until Judgment Day."

An old custom that can be re-created today is the construction of the Kern-baby or corn maiden at Lammas. This figure, originally made from the first sheaf, would be saved until spring, then ploughed into the field to prepare for planting. (The Maiden thus returns to the field at Spring.) Most of us, today, have no first sheaf nor shall we prepare a field at Spring, but as a means of adding continuity to our festivals, the maiden can be made from the husks of corn served at the Lammas Feast, then saved for use as a brideo'g at Candlemas.

"We have come together here on this August Eve, to celebrate Lammas, the First Harvest, and the first day of the harvesting season. In these more modern times it may be hard for some of us to relate to the old ways of farming, planting and harvesting crops. Of deciding what seeds to keep for future planting. The work of the harvest, the chopping away and turning under of the chafe. Even though most of us no longer farm, Lammas is still a time when we should stop and consider what has happened in the past seasons of our lives and what we expect to take place in the seasons to come. This is a time to be aware of the things we have for which we are grateful and decide what things we need to let go of and let pass away from us." "Lammas was the medieval Christian name for the Celtic holiday of Lughnasadh. Lammas literally translates 'loaf-mass' and is the Feast of Bread in August. Lammas is a time of appreciation for nature, for Mother Earth and her gifts. In ancient times on this day loaves were baked from the first grain harvest and laid on the church altars as offerings. At this time the best of the first fruits of the harvest were sacrificed in order to ensure that future crops would be even better and more bountiful. Our Ancestors understood that we must first give in order to receive."

The oak can takes some 60 years to mature and produce its first full crop of fruit. Depending on seasonal conditions, tufts of pale green leaves appear on short stalks (English or Common oak) during April or May, which by June turn dark green and thick with a strong central vein and deeply lobed edges. Should the young leaves be damaged by frost or destroyed by insects, the oak has a canny ability to re-leaf itself. In August at the height of the summer when most other trees are wilting from the heat, the oak produces a new leaf called “Lammas shoots” thus adding new colour and freshness to the tree. These new leafy shoots are golden-pink when young, turning from pale to dark green as they harden. In autumn the oak tree is at its most majestic as its leaves change colour again turning from dark green to various shades of yellow, orange, russet and a pale golden brown. The leaves sometime stay on the tree until the following spring or until the new buds forming for the next year push them off.

http://www.controverscial.com/Oak.htm  

Its summer, and the oak tree produces a second crop of leaves the lammas growth to replace its now tatty spring canopy.

 

This is Lammas growth, when trees put on a second flush of bright leaves in July and August, around Lammas day, August 1, which is a Celtic harvest festival ...
www.telegraph.co.uk/property/main.jhtml xml=/property/2006/08/16/pbunny16.xml - 44k - Cached - Similar pages  I've noticed that many trees have a second flush of growth at this time. Can I trigger this?

This is Lammas growth, when trees put on a second flush of bright leaves in July and August, around Lammas day, August 1, which is a Celtic harvest festival. Oak, ash, beech, sycamore and hawthorn produce a secondary growth while poplar, birch and willow do not. It is worth watering to encourage this second growth and build up healthy reserves for next year. I find this most useful when trying to speed up growth of newly-planted yew and hawthorn hedges, which can respond with amazing vigour.

Because of the large numbers of insects and other invertebrates which feed upon oaks, many of the leaves can be tattered and have numerous holes in them by late July. Oaks then produce a new flush of leaves, especially on young trees, and this phenomenon is called lammas growth, because it occurs around the time of Lammas, the Celtic festival of first fruits, on 1st August.

as the harsher climate and poorer soils limit their growth. ... lammas growth, because it occurs around the time of Lammas, the Celtic festival of first ...
www.treesforlife.org.uk/forest/species/oak.html  - 31k -  

In Old Irish Lunasa means “August.” The Celts celebrate this day from sunset ... made from the first fruits of the harvest, was brought to the church to be ...
folktalesmyths.suite101.com/article.cfm/august_harvest_traditions - 29k - Cached - Similar pages

August Harvest Traditions

Myths and Customs that Celebrate the Gathering of Grain

© Missy Worrells

The first harvest signifies the death of the crops as grain is gathered, and the thanksgiving of the people to the deities who provided them with life sustaining grains.

Late July and Early August mark the middle of summer and the beginning of the harvest season. Famine was common during July as the previous years harvest supplies were almost totally depleted. Harvesting grains in August ensured the continuance of life and was recognized by many cultures as a time of thanksgiving.

In ancient Rome the grain goddess Ceres was honored on the first harvest called Ceresalia in her honor. Our modern word cereal comes from her name. Other goddesses celebrated at first harvest are Demeter, Persephone, Kore, Ethne, Venus, and the Corn Mother. Many Native American tribes honor the Corn Grandmother during the Festival of Green Corn. It was held during the full moon when the corn was ready to be harvested. The celebration lasted for several days and was a time to be thankful and a time of forgiveness.

Lughnasadh was a joyous time greatly anticipated as the first of three harvest festivals. Lughnasadh honors the god Lugh, and his foster-mother Taillte who died clearing the fields of Ireland for agriculture. In Old Irish Lunasa means “August.” The Celts celebrate this day from sunset of August 1 to sunset on August 2 as the wake of Lugh, the Sun-King whose light began to dwindle after the summer solstice. At this time oaths were taken and contracts were signed. Taillte marriages, lasting a year and a day, were common also.

This day was know to the Saxons as Lammas, or loaf-mass, a time when grains were harvested and baked into bread. The grain was harvested, giving its life so that people might live. The grain was made into bread, and the bread was symbolic of the gods. This closely echoes the Christian concept of communion. Christians later adopted this holiday as a day when bread, made from the first fruits of the harvest, was brought to the church to be blessed.

Today many neo-pagans still celebrate Lammas or Lughnasadh as one of the eight sabbats. It is the first of three sabbats that celebrate the passing of light and the gathering of grains. Lammas is a time used to consider what has metaphorically been harvested over the past year. Wheat is woven into decorative pieces as resting places for harvest spirits then burned after the winter has passed. Bread is made and symbolically sacrificed in honor of the god. Corn dollies are made from cornhusk or wheat to represent the goddess who is still pregnant with the fruits of harvest.

August is a time to reflect on the past year, on things that have come to fruition and things that failed. A time to let go of regrets and say farewell to things that have passed and preserve all the fruits that have been gathered to hold onto for future memories.

August Harvest Traditions

Myths and Customs that Celebrate the Gathering of Grain

© Missy Worrells

 

The first harvest signifies the death of the crops as grain is gathered, and the thanksgiving of the people to the deities who provided them with life sustaining grains.

Late July and Early August mark the middle of summer and the beginning of the harvest season. Famine was common during July as the previous years harvest supplies were almost totally depleted. Harvesting grains in August ensured the continuance of life and was recognized by many cultures as a time of thanksgiving.

In ancient Rome the grain goddess Ceres was honored on the first harvest called Ceresalia in her honor. Our modern word cereal comes from her name. Other goddesses celebrated at first harvest are Demeter, Persephone, Kore, Ethne, Venus, and the Corn Mother. Many Native American tribes honor the Corn Grandmother during the Festival of Green Corn. It was held during the full moon when the corn was ready to be harvested. The celebration lasted for several days and was a time to be thankful and a time of forgiveness.

Lughnasadh was a joyous time greatly anticipated as the first of three harvest festivals. Lughnasadh honors the god Lugh, and his foster-mother Taillte who died clearing the fields of Ireland for agriculture. In Old Irish Lunasa means “August.” The Celts celebrate this day from sunset of August 1 to sunset on August 2 as the wake of Lugh, the Sun-King whose light began to dwindle after the summer solstice. At this time oaths were taken and contracts were signed. Taillte marriages, lasting a year and a day, were common also.

This day was know to the Saxons as Lammas, or loaf-mass, a time when grains were harvested and baked into bread. The grain was harvested, giving its life so that people might live. The grain was made into bread, and the bread was symbolic of the gods. This closely echoes the Christian concept of communion. Christians later adopted this holiday as a day when bread, made from the first fruits of the harvest, was brought to the church to be blessed.

 

In Old Irish Lunasa means “August.” The Celts celebrate this day from sunset ... made from the first fruits of the harvest, was brought to the church to be ...
folktalesmyths.suite101.com/article.cfm/august_harvest_traditions - 29k - Cached - Similar pages

August Harvest Traditions

Myths and Customs that Celebrate the Gathering of Grain

© Missy Worrells

 

The first harvest signifies the death of the crops as grain is gathered, and the thanksgiving of the people to the deities who provided them with life sustaining grains.

Late July and Early August mark the middle of summer and the beginning of the harvest season. Famine was common during July as the previous years harvest supplies were almost totally depleted. Harvesting grains in August ensured the continuance of life and was recognized by many cultures as a time of thanksgiving.

In ancient Rome the grain goddess Ceres was honored on the first harvest called Ceresalia in her honor. Our modern word cereal comes from her name. Other goddesses celebrated at first harvest are Demeter, Persephone, Kore, Ethne, Venus, and the Corn Mother. Many Native American tribes honor the Corn Grandmother during the Festival of Green Corn. It was held during the full moon when the corn was ready to be harvested. The celebration lasted for several days and was a time to be thankful and a time of forgiveness.

Lughnasadh was a joyous time greatly anticipated as the first of three harvest festivals. Lughnasadh honors the god Lugh, and his foster-mother Taillte who died clearing the fields of Ireland for agriculture. In Old Irish Lunasa means “August.” The Celts celebrate this day from sunset of August 1 to sunset on August 2 as the wake of Lugh, the Sun-King whose light began to dwindle after the summer solstice. At this time oaths were taken and contracts were signed. Taillte marriages, lasting a year and a day, were common also.

This day was know to the Saxons as Lammas, or loaf-mass, a time when grains were harvested and baked into bread. The grain was harvested, giving its life so that people might live. The grain was made into bread, and the bread was symbolic of the gods. This closely echoes the Christian concept of communion. Christians later adopted this holiday as a day when bread, made from the first fruits of the harvest, was brought to the church to be blessed.

Today many neo-pagans still celebrate Lammas or Lughnasadh as one of the eight sabbats. It is the first of three sabbats that celebrate the passing of light and the gathering of grains. Lammas is a time used to consider what has metaphorically been harvested over the past year. Wheat is woven into decorative pieces as resting places for harvest spirits then burned after the winter has passed. Bread is made and symbolically sacrificed in honor of the god. Corn dollies are made from cornhusk or wheat to represent the goddess who is still pregnant with the fruits of harvest.

August is a time to reflect on the past year, on things that have come to fruition and things that failed. A time to let go of regrets and say farewell to things that have passed and preserve all the fruits that have been gathered to hold onto for future memories.

August Harvest Traditions

Myths and Customs that Celebrate the Gathering of Grain

© Missy Worrells

 

The first harvest signifies the death of the crops as grain is gathered, and the thanksgiving of the people to the deities who provided them with life sustaining grains.

Late July and Early August mark the middle of summer and the beginning of the harvest season. Famine was common during July as the previous years harvest supplies were almost totally depleted. Harvesting grains in August ensured the continuance of life and was recognized by many cultures as a time of thanksgiving.

In ancient Rome the grain goddess Ceres was honored on the first harvest called Ceresalia in her honor. Our modern word cereal comes from her name. Other goddesses celebrated at first harvest are Demeter, Persephone, Kore, Ethne, Venus, and the Corn Mother. Many Native American tribes honor the Corn Grandmother during the Festival of Green Corn. It was held during the full moon when the corn was ready to be harvested. The celebration lasted for several days and was a time to be thankful and a time of forgiveness.

Lughnasadh was a joyous time greatly anticipated as the first of three harvest festivals. Lughnasadh honors the god Lugh, and his foster-mother Taillte who died clearing the fields of Ireland for agriculture. In Old Irish Lunasa means “August.” The Celts celebrate this day from sunset of August 1 to sunset on August 2 as the wake of Lugh, the Sun-King whose light began to dwindle after the summer solstice. At this time oaths were taken and contracts were signed. Taillte marriages, lasting a year and a day, were common also.

This day was know to the Saxons as Lammas, or loaf-mass, a time when grains were harvested and baked into bread. The grain was harvested, giving its life so that people might live. The grain was made into bread, and the bread was symbolic of the gods. This closely echoes the Christian concept of communion. Christians later adopted this holiday as a day when bread, made from the first fruits of the harvest, was brought to the church to be blessed.

Today many neo-pagans still celebrate Lammas or Lughnasadh as one of the eight sabbats. It is the first of three sabbats that celebrate the passing of light and the gathering of grains. Lammas is a time used to consider what has metaphorically been harvested over the past year. Wheat is woven into decorative pieces as resting places for harvest spirits then burned after the winter has passed. Bread is made and symbolically sacrificed in honor of the god. Corn dollies are made from cornhusk or wheat to represent the goddess who is still pregnant with the fruits of harvest.

August is a time to reflect on the past year, on things that have come to fruition and things that failed. A time to let go of regrets and say farewell to things that have passed and preserve all the fruits that have been gathered to hold onto for future memories.

Winter wheat accounts for 100% of E.U. production. Depending on the region, winter

wheat is planted in the months of October or November and harvested in late summer

during the months of June, July, or August in France, Germany, U.K., Spain, and Italy.

Harvesting

Winter wheat usually outyields spring wheat. It is ready for harvest at the end of July or beginning of August. Winter wheat can be combined or it can be swathed first and then combined. Swathing before the grain becomes too ripe will reduce losses from seed shattering. Harvest wheat when the kernal is hard to the fingernail (soft wheat can be indented with the fingernail, hard wheat can not).

 

Seeding at the ideal time allows winter wheat to germinate, develop at least ... In general, recent Alberta research has shown that spring plant population ...
www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/agdex11601 - 23k -  Cached - Similar pages

Winter wheat is an excellent crop for many southern and central Alberta farmers to consider growing. Winter wheat should be direct-seeded in early September and is usually harvested several weeks earlier than spring wheat the next year. Therefore, including winter wheat in the crop rotation spreads out the workload and results in good time management for farmers.

In most years, winter wheat can potentially be up to 20 per cent higher yielding than spring wheat, making it an economically attractive crop. In southern Alberta in 2007, yields of winter wheat are predicted to exceed spring wheat by 40 to 50 per cent in some areas, due to the hot, dry July conditions.

I know this some skeptics will say that these feast were kept in honor of other gods and not to Yahweh and therefore they cannot be right.

While it is true that ancient Israelite people honored other gods, it is also true that they done it around the appointed times of the true festivals of Yahweh and this is evident when we look at Passover versus Easter, in essence, just because people hunt Easter eggs on Passover after the pagan goddess Easter, goddess of fertility, does not mean that true Passover does not exist around this time. The same is true with many of Yahweh’s feast and there is no need for us to waste a lot of time trying to use paganism to dodge the Historical facts of the timing of how ancient Israel observed these major feast. Unless you are willing to say that Passover does not exist because of the paganism of Easter that is mixed with it, you should not try to say that these other feast do not exist and try to create a smokescreen when these unbiased people are simply telling us how and when these Celtic people or ancient Israelites observed these festivals.

To try to dismiss these facts just because paganism has crept in is not wise because it is like trying to dismiss Passover because Easter has crept in. As a matter of fact, I think it enhances our argument because Israel has always been notorious for going after other god sand treading His courts in a hypocritical manner and that is what these Celtic Israelite people were doing by giving honor to another on his Holy days, so let’s don’t go off on a rabbit trail trying to dodge the facts of the matter just because it does not line up with your theology. Remember how that the Israelites said “these be the gods that brought you out of the land of Egypt”, referring to the Golden calf and this was only 102 days after seeing all the miracles that YHWH done in the land of Egypt. They were keeping a Chag to Yahweh 50 days AFTER the seventh lunar Sabbath complete, see Exodus 32:5, and Yahweh scolded them severely for worshiping on his Holy day and even killed 3000 of them, but said nothing against the timing of this feast, only the worship of the Golden image. It was on the very day that the law was given to Moses, which was written in stone, with the finger of Yahweh. There were 3000 souls saved when the law was written in the heart, instead of stone, in the book of Acts of the Apostles, and they were both on the day of Pentecost.

These web sites searched the Celtic Chronicles and other historical evidence and it seems obvious from what I have read, there is no third month feast mentioned in historyif, same as there is no third month feast mentioned in Scripture. These are cold hard facts and to be in denial of this is to be in denial of Scripture, because there is NO third month feast mentioned In Scripture. I have said it again and probably will say it more until someone gets the message that there is “NO” third month feast or wheat harvest in Scripture OR Ancient History. I challenge someone to prove me wrong? Remember Leviticus 23:16 can be understood two different ways and therefore we must find a scripture that supports the correct interpretation of when we are to number the 50 days, is it after the wave sheaf 50 days AFTER the seventh Sabbath complete?

People could argue that they know more about farming than ancient Israel did and what type of Wheat that they grew back then, but this is not wise either. You really need to read my article on Pentecost at www.lunarsabbath.info.

YHWH’S will, I will correct any mistakes and finish this later.

Brother Arnold www.lunarsabbath.info

Agronomic Management of Winter Wheat in Alberta
Aug 2, 2007
Aug 2, 2007
August Harvest Traditions: Myths and Customs that Celebrate the ... Home www.lunarsabbath.info